Is it EAB or not?

What do you have? Choose an option above.

The hole I have seen is both D-shaped and 1/8" across.

EAB exit hole. Photo by David R. McKay, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org

EAB exit hole. Photo by David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

EAB exit holes. Photo by Daniel Herms, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org

The hole I have seen is NOT both D-shaped and 1/8" across.

Redheaded ash borer exit hole (oval, larger than 1/8 inch long) Photo: www.imaginemason.org/pdfs/eab_redheaded_ash_borer_h.jpg

Lilac borer/ash borer exit holes (round, 1/4 inch in diameter or larger) Photo by Laurie Stepanek, Nebraska Forest Service, University of Nebraska

Lilac borer/ash borer exit holes and cast skins (holes round, 1/4 inch in diameter or larger) Photo by Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org

Ash bark beetle exit holes (round, 1/16 inch in diameter) Photo by James Solomon, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org

Emerald ash borer adults are:
• about 1/2" long
• slender
• green


My insect looks like that.

My insect does NOT look like that.

Photo: David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

Photo: Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources - Forestry Archive, Bugwood.org

Photo: Howard Russell, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

Emerald ash borer larvae are:
• white
• somewhat flattened
• up to one inch long
• have bell-shaped segments near the back end
• have no legs


My insect looks like that.

My insect does NOT look like that.

Photo: David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

Photo: David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

Photo: Photo: David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

Emerald ash borer pupae are:
• white to dark
• slender
• about 1/2" long
• usually found just beneath the bark


My insect looks like that.

My insect does NOT look like that.

Photo: David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

Photo: http://www.na.fs.fed.us/fhp/eab/img/images/ventral_dorsal.jpg

My insect still looks like Emerald Ash Borer.


If possible, please send a digital picture of the insect to Mark Harrell at mharrell2@unl.edu.

If you cannot send a picture, please e-mail or call Mark Harrell at mharrell2@unl.edu or 402-472-6635, Laurie Stepanek at 402-472-5503 or the Nebraska Forest Service main office at 402-472-2944 and let us know what you have.

Thank you!

My insect looks like that.


Please compare your insect with these that look like emerald ash borer:

My insect still looks like Emerald Ash Borer. ... or ... My insect looks like a different insect.


Roundheaded borer larva. Photo: Michael Bohne, Bugwood.org

Roundheader borer larva

  • body fairly round
  • no bell-shaped segments

Clearwing moth larva. Photo: David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

Carpenterworm larva with legs showing. Photo: James Solomon, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org

Clearwing moth larva and carpenter moth larve:

  • body fairly round
  • legs near the head
  • no bell-shaped segments

Emerald Ash Borer larva. Photo: David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

Emerald Ash Borer larva:

  • unique bell-shaped segments near the back end (circled)
  • no legs

The hole I have seen is both D-shaped and 1/8" across.

EAB exit hole. Photo by David R. McKay, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org

EAB exit hole. Photo by David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

EAB exit holes. Photo by Daniel Herms, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org

The hole I have seen is NOT both D-shaped and 1/8" across.

Redheaded ash borer exit hole (oval, larger than 1/8 inch long) Photo: www.imaginemason.org/pdfs/eab_redheaded_ash_borer_h.jpg

Lilac borer/ash borer exit holes (round, 1/4 inch in diameter or larger) Photo by Laurie Stepanek, Nebraska Forest Service, University of Nebraska

Lilac borer/ash borer exit holes and cast skins (holes round, 1/4 inch in diameter or larger) Photo by Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org

Ash bark beetle exit holes (round, 1/16 inch in diameter) Photo by James Solomon, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org

The hole I have seen is both D-shaped and 1/8" across.


My tree is an ash tree.


Ash trees have opposite branching and compound leaves with 5-11 leaflets. Each compound leaf has a bud next to it on the stem. Not all ash trees produce seeds.

I am sure my tree is an ash tree. ... or ... My tree is NOT an ash tree.

I am not sure what my tree is.


Ash trees have opposite branching and compound leaves with 5-11 leaflets. Each compound leaf has a bud next to it on the stem. Not all ash trees produce seeds.

I am sure my tree is an ash tree. ... or ... My tree is NOT an ash tree.

I am sure my tree is an ash tree.


If possible, please send a digital picture of the hole with a ruler held by it to Mark Harrell at mharrell2@unl.edu.

If you cannot send a picture, please e-mail or call Mark Harrell at mharrell2@unl.edu or 402-472-6635, or Laurie Stepanek at 402-472-5503 and let us know what you have.

Thank you!

My tree is an ash tree.


Ash trees have opposite branching and compound leaves with 5-11 leaflets. Each compound leaf has a bud next to it on the stem. Not all ash trees produce seeds.

I am sure my tree is an ash tree. ... or ... My tree is NOT an ash tree.

I am not sure what my tree is.


Ash trees have opposite branching and compound leaves with 5-11 leaflets. Each compound leaf has a bud next to it on the stem. Not all ash trees produce seeds.

I am sure my tree is an ash tree. ... or ... My tree is NOT an ash tree.

I am sure my tree is an ash tree.


If ash trees are dying from EAB, they will have parts of the bark in the upper part of the tree chipped off by woodpeckers looking for EAB larvae. These areas will be much lighter in color than the areas around them.

I see woodpecker damage. ... or ... I do NOT see any woodpecker damage.


Photo: Jim Tresouthick, Village of Homewood, Bugwood.org

Photo: Jim Tresouthick, Village of Homewood, Bugwood.org

Photo: Steven Katovich, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org

Photo: Steven Katovich, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org

I see woodpecker damage.


If possible, please send a digital picture of the woodpecker damage to Mark Harrell at mharrell2@unl.edu.

If you cannot send a picture, please e-mail or call Mark Harrell at mharrell2@unl.edu or 402-472-6635, or Laurie Stepanek at 402-472-5503 and let us know what you have.

Thank you!

I do NOT see woodpecker damage.


Other symptoms caused by EAB in dying trees include:

  • D-shaped holes about 1/8" across
  • S-shaped tunnels on the surface of the wood under bark that is peeling off
  • Small branches growing out of the trunk near the base of the tree

Click the heading of the column with the symptoms you see. If you do not see any of these, click here.

I see D-shaped holes

Photo: David R. McKay, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org


Photo: David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org


Photo: Daniel Herms, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org


I see S-shaped tunnels

Photo: Edward Czerwinski, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Bugwood.org


Photo: Edward Czerwinski, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Bugwood.org


Photo: Penn. Dep. of Conservation and Natural Resources - Forestry Archive, Bugwood.org


I see small branches

Photo: Edward Czerwinski, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Bugwood.org


Photo: Pennsylvania Dep. of Conservation and Natural Resources - Forestry Archive, , Bugwood.org


Photo: Joseph O'Brien, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org


I see S-shaped tunnels under the bark


EAB tunnels are almost entirely on the surface of the wood and do not go deep into the tree. At the most, the tunnels go only about 1/2 inch into the wood when the mature larva is about to become a pupa (stage just before the adult).

If the tunnels you are seeing are S-shaped and do not go deeper than about 1/2 inch into the wood, please send a digital picture of the woodpecker damage to Mark Harrell at mharrell2@unl.edu.

If you cannot send a picture, please e-mail or call Mark Harrell at mharrell2@unl.edu or 402-472-6635, or Laurie Stepanek at 402-472-5503 and let us know what you have.

Thank you!

Here are some links to websites that might be helpful to you:

I see small branches growing near the base of the trunk


Small branches grow out from the trunk near the base whenever ash trees begin dying from the top. The dying from the top could be caused by a number of problems.

Please look closely at the trunk for any D-shaped holes about 1/8 inch across that could be from emerald ash borers (holes). Please look also for any loose bark that may peel easily from the tree and have S-shaped tunnels below it (tunnels), or any areas on the trunk or branches where woodpeckers have been chipping bark away (woodpeckers). If you see any of these, please send a digital picture of what you see to Mark Harrell at mharrell2@unl.edu. If you cannot send a picture, please e-mail or call Mark Harrell at mharrell2@unl.edu or 402-472-6635, or Laurie Stepanek at 402-472-5503 and let us know what you have.

If you do not see D-shaped holes, S-shaped tunnels, or woodpecker damage, your tree is probably dying because of another problem. You may find the information at the links below helpful in identifying the problem your tree has. Please look at your tree several times each year to see if you later find the D-shaped holes, S-shaped tunnels, or woodpecker damage. If you do find them later, please let us know.

Here are some links to websites that might be helpful to you:

I do not see D-shaped holes, S-shaped tunnels or branches growing out of the trunk


If you do not see D-shaped holes, S-shaped tunnels, or woodpecker damage, your tree is probably dying because of another problem. You may find the information at the links below helpful in identifying the problem your tree has.

Please look at your tree several times each year to see if you later find D-shaped holes (holes), S- shaped tunnels (tunnels), or woodpecker damage (woodpeckers). If you do find them later, please let us know.

Here are some links to websites that might be helpful to you: