Publications

Diseases

Dying Scotch pine tree.

Pine Wilt: A fatal disease of Scotch pine

Scotch pine, a popular tree for ornamental plantings, windbreaks and Christmas trees, is rapidly disappearing from Nebraska's landscape. The tree is susceptible to pine wilt, a disease that has killed thousands of Scotch pines in the southeastern part of the state since the mid-1990s. This publication discusses pone wilt and how to control the disease.

Read more about Pine Wilt: A fatal disease of Scotch pine

Eastern redcedar

Logger holds hand next to eastern redcedar stump.

Eastern Redcedar in Nebraska: Nebraska Conservation Roundtable

Eastern redcedar, Juniperus virginiana, is a native tree that has always been a fixture on the Nebraska landscape, providing valuable wood products, wind and soil protection, and habitat for a variety of species of wildlife. However, the rapid spread of cedar is an increasingly serious ecological and economic issue with substantial impacts statewide. 

Read more about Eastern Redcedar in Nebraska: Nebraska Conservation Roundtable

Emerald ash borer

Portable sawmill processing ash log.

Ash Wood Utilization Options for Homeowners

Emerald ash borer (EAB) poses a serious threat to ash trees in both communities and residential landscapes, killing 80% of ash trees in infested regions within 10 years of its discovery. In communities, standing dead and dying trees will pose a threat to people and property. Unless a homeowner is dedicated to treating their tree long into the future, most ash trees will die and need to be removed.

Read more about Ash Wood Utilization Options for Homeowners
Adult EAB insect, closeup.

Emerald Ash Borer Look-Alikes

There are many bright metallic-green insects in Nebraska, but the emerald ash borer beetle is only a half-inch long and strictly associated with ash trees. Use the chart to help determine if EAB is present on your property. 

Read more about Emerald Ash Borer Look-Alikes
Image of tree with emerald ash borer galleries

Selecting Trees for Emerald Ash Borer Treatment

Ash trees provide many benefits to home landscapes. This publication provides information to help you select those trees most suitable for treatments to protect them from emerald ash borer (EAB).
Read more about Selecting Trees for Emerald Ash Borer Treatment

Español

A volunteer plants a tree at an Omaha park.

Árboles para Nebraska

Las condiciones ambientales en Nebraska dificultan que muchos árboles sobrevivan o crezcan bien. Varias condiciones como los tipos de suelo, el calor, las temperaturas invernales fluctuantes, los vientos fuertes y la sequía contribuyen a condiciones estresantes para los árboles. La siguiente lista es una de árboles recomendados para plantar a lo largo de calles, parques, escuelas y otras áreas públicas, así como patios privados. Si necesita recomendaciones específicas sobre las especies de árboles que se enumeran a continuación, visite a su profesional de vivero local.

Read more about Árboles para Nebraska

Flooding

Flooded trees at Hayworth Park

Inspecting Flood Damaged Trees

Even under the best of circumstances, half of a tree’s living tissue is under the soil and out of sight. Since the root system is the portion of a tree most adversely affected by flooding, signs of flooding damage in the canopy are usually delayed. As a guiding element, in a long-term flooding situation, you should expect that some level of damage has occurred to the root system as a result of low oxygen conditions. 

Read more about Inspecting Flood Damaged Trees

Forest management

How to Manage Your Woodland

Nebraska's forest lands comprise less than 2 percent of the total land base in the state (718,300 acres). However, on an acre by acre comparison, woodlands provide more associ­ated benefits for society, the environment and our quality of life than most other land uses. With the vast diversity of benefits that are obtained from Nebraska's woodlands compared to the limited acreage they occupy, it is important to properly manage those acres for sustained health and continued benefits. 

Read more about How to Manage Your Woodland

Grants

Students playing in playground

Financial Assistance and Grants

There are several opportunities available for financial assistance with the Nebraska Forest Sevice. Each grant has its own unique requirements but all will include an element of cost-sharing of the project. Cost-share is reimbursed to the applicant after a project’s successful completion.

While applications may seem difficult, our staff is available to help you assess your project, determine the best source of funding, and help you get paperwork in order. It is a no-cost service we provide to help you reach your project’s end goals.

Read more about Financial Assistance and Grants

Guides

Cover of Trees of Nebraska publication.

Trees of Nebraska

This manual will show you how to identify 97 tree species by comparing leaves, twigs, fruit, bark, and other parts. You will learn how to look at and compare these parts and how to use a dichotomous key to identify species. Many of the species included in this manual are native to Nebraska, meaning they occur here naturally. Some are not native but are commonly planted. A few are naturalized; they are not native but have escaped cultivation and are growing in the wild. 

Read more about Trees of Nebraska

Hazelnuts

NFS Staff re-potting hazelnut trees in 2016.

Commercializing Hybrid Hazelnuts

The goal of hazelnut research is to accelerate commercial development of the hybrid hazelnut as a profitable, environmentally friendly food and bioenergy crop for producers in Nebraska and the central United States.

Read more about Commercializing Hybrid Hazelnuts

Herbicide damage

Leaf cupping of an oak tree. This is typical of dicamba or 2,4-D exposure.

Herbicide Damage to Trees

Herbicides can be effective tools for controlling unwanted weeds in the landscape. However, in recent years, the Nebraska Forest Service has seen a significant increase in unintended herbicide damage to trees and other landscape plants. You can assist us in documenting damage across Nebraska. Please note the NFS is not a regulatory agency. 

Submit a damage report

Read more about Herbicide Damage to Trees

Nut production

NFS Staff re-potting hazelnut trees in 2016.

Commercializing Hybrid Hazelnuts

The goal of hazelnut research is to accelerate commercial development of the hybrid hazelnut as a profitable, environmentally friendly food and bioenergy crop for producers in Nebraska and the central United States.

Read more about Commercializing Hybrid Hazelnuts

Pruning

Pruning Large Trees

Storm damage to large trees can cause large problems. These problems can exist immediately after the storm or become evident many months or even years later. Since large trees involve large branches with significant weight, this kind of storm repair is best left to qualified professional arborists. Here are some things you can do to help larger trees recover from storm damage.

Read more about Pruning Large Trees

Pruning Trees

Pruning is one of the most important tree maintenance practices.  Over the years, the way in which we, as foresters, have approached pruning has changed dramatically.  Today pruning is a science that, if not done properly, can be very damaging to a tree. Here are some tips that may be of help to you before you take the saw to the tree. 

Read more about Pruning Trees

Reports

Logger holds hand next to eastern redcedar stump.

Eastern Redcedar in Nebraska: Nebraska Conservation Roundtable

Eastern redcedar, Juniperus virginiana, is a native tree that has always been a fixture on the Nebraska landscape, providing valuable wood products, wind and soil protection, and habitat for a variety of species of wildlife. However, the rapid spread of cedar is an increasingly serious ecological and economic issue with substantial impacts statewide. 

Read more about Eastern Redcedar in Nebraska: Nebraska Conservation Roundtable
Girl walking on log with her dog.

2018 Annual Report

Download the PDF to read about the accomplishments and highlights of the Nebraska Forest Service in 2018. 

Read more about 2018 Annual Report

Forest Health 2017

Nebraska boasts a diverse array of forest resources. From the ponderosa pine forests of the Panhandle’s Pine Ridge to the hardwood forests of the Missouri River bluffs, trees and forests play an important role in the lives of all Nebraskans and in the stability of ecological systems across the state and region.

Read more about Forest Health 2017
Stream in the Niobrara River Valley

Forest Health 2018

Nebraska boasts a diverse array of forest resources. From the ponderosa pine forests of the Panhandle’s Pine Ridge to the hardwood forests of the Missouri River bluffs, trees and forests play an important role in the lives of all Nebraskans and in the stability of ecological systems across the state and region.

Read more about Forest Health 2018
Homeowner walks through the aftermath of a wildfire.

Implications of Climate Change for Nebraska

This comprehensive report summarized the current understanding of climate change science, projected changes in climate for Nebraska, and addressed the implications of these changes for some of the state’s primary sectors. This report also documented many of the key challenges that the state will face as a result of climate change. A key takeaway message from the report was the need to identify those actions that need to be implemented now and in the coming years to avoid or reduce the deleterious effects of climate change on Nebraska through appropriate adaptation and mitigation measures.

Read more about Implications of Climate Change for Nebraska
Niobrara Valley river system landscape.

Nebraska Forest Resources

Many Nebraskans would be surprised to learn that in our largely agricultural and grassland state, unique and diverse forest resources are substantial and growing.

Read more about Nebraska Forest Resources
Panoramic view of trees and the Niobrara River.

Nebraska's Forests 2010

The second full annual inventory of Nebraska's forests reports more than 1.5 million acres of forest land and 39 tree species. Forest land is dominated by the elm/ash/cottonwood and oak/hickory forest types, which occupy nearly half of the total forest land area. The volume of growing stock on timberland currently totals 1.1 billion cubic feet. The average annual net growth of growing stock from 2005 to 2010 is nearly 22 million cubic feet per year. 

Read more about Nebraska's Forests 2010

Woodwaste Supply & Utilization

Increased utilization of wood waste can help decrease our Nation's dependence on foreign energy purchases, generate energy cost-savings, enhance the efficiencies of forest and range management efforts, reduce the amount of wood waste disposed of in landfills and stimulate local economic development. 

Read more about Woodwaste Supply & Utilization

Transporting wood

Portable sawmill processing ash log.

Ash Wood Utilization Options for Homeowners

Emerald ash borer (EAB) poses a serious threat to ash trees in both communities and residential landscapes, killing 80% of ash trees in infested regions within 10 years of its discovery. In communities, standing dead and dying trees will pose a threat to people and property. Unless a homeowner is dedicated to treating their tree long into the future, most ash trees will die and need to be removed.

Read more about Ash Wood Utilization Options for Homeowners
Photo of walnut wood in back of a truck

Restrictions on Moving Walnut Wood

The movement of walnut wood into Nebraska from other states is restricted by law. Walnut logs, firewood, green lumber, woodchips, and nursery trees are among the walnut products included in this quarantine. This brochure discusses the purpose of the quarantine and its restrictions, which will help protect the walnut industry and the native and planted walnut trees of our state.

Read more about Restrictions on Moving Walnut Wood

Tree care

Photo demonstrating circling roots caused by a container

Tree Care Basics: Finding the Root of the Problem

Every year, homeowners search nursery catalogs and garden centers for the perfect tree to plant in their yards. They look for a tree that grows fast, isn’t messy, provides abundant shade and is free of insect and disease problems. However once planted, staked, fertilized and nurtured, it struggles and grows very slowly or not at all. This common problem often begins with the roots. There are three main types of damage or injury to root systems that can occur in young trees: root circling caused by a container, root damage, and improper planting techniques.

Read more about Tree Care Basics: Finding the Root of the Problem
Residents of Pender standing next to newly planted tree.

Care of Newly Planted Trees

Landscape trees provide beauty and utility. The care they receive during the first few years after planting is critical. Many recommendations have changed drastically in recent years in light of new and more thorough research. 

Read more about Care of Newly Planted Trees

Don’t ‘Top’ Trees

Many trees damaged by severe storms have large broken branches. Properly repairing trees with this type of damage is often difficult and more time-consuming than the simpler job of “topping” the trees. Topping is very destructive and is not recommended. Here are some things to consider if a tree worker recommends topping a tree.

Read more about Don’t ‘Top’ Trees

Drought Stress on Trees

Nebraska landscapes experience a great deal of "climate weirdness." Lack of significant moisture and long-term high temperatures put stress on landscapes. How then do we sustain our landscapes in these unusual circumstances?

Read more about Drought Stress on Trees

Fertilizing Landscape Trees and Shrubs

Most Nebraska soils are fertile enough to support tree and shrub growth without applying fertilizer. However, when woody plants exhibit poor growth or reduced vigor, yet have had adequate moisture and are not experiencing pest problems or other environmental limitations, the proper application of fertilizer may be necessary.

Read more about Fertilizing Landscape Trees and Shrubs
Person chainsawing a tree.

How to Select an Arborist or Tree Service

Hiring an arborist deserves careful consideration. A qualified arborist will do tree work properly and safely. An unqualified person may damage the tree further and more importantly, may not be insured, leaving the liability burden on the client. This liability can run into tens of thousands of dollars.

Read more about How to Select an Arborist or Tree Service

Immediate Care for Storm-Damaged Trees

Trees damaged by storms require immediate attention (removing low-hanging branches, clearing from utility lines, etc.). Homeowners need to be aware of safety issues and consider the best approach for dealing with a tree they are trying to save.

Read more about Immediate Care for Storm-Damaged Trees
Flooded trees at Hayworth Park

Inspecting Flood Damaged Trees

Even under the best of circumstances, half of a tree’s living tissue is under the soil and out of sight. Since the root system is the portion of a tree most adversely affected by flooding, signs of flooding damage in the canopy are usually delayed. As a guiding element, in a long-term flooding situation, you should expect that some level of damage has occurred to the root system as a result of low oxygen conditions. 

Read more about Inspecting Flood Damaged Trees

Pruning Large Trees

Storm damage to large trees can cause large problems. These problems can exist immediately after the storm or become evident many months or even years later. Since large trees involve large branches with significant weight, this kind of storm repair is best left to qualified professional arborists. Here are some things you can do to help larger trees recover from storm damage.

Read more about Pruning Large Trees

Pruning Trees

Pruning is one of the most important tree maintenance practices.  Over the years, the way in which we, as foresters, have approached pruning has changed dramatically.  Today pruning is a science that, if not done properly, can be very damaging to a tree. Here are some tips that may be of help to you before you take the saw to the tree. 

Read more about Pruning Trees

Tree issues

Photo of tree experiencing drought

Abiotic Problems of Trees

Abiotic disorders are caused by nonliving events, such as drought stress, sunscald, freeze injury, wind injury, chemical injury, nutrient deficiency, or improper tree care, like overwatering or improper planting. Use this guide as a quick reference to help isolate your tree's issue(s). 

Read more about Abiotic Problems of Trees
Bagworms, Webworms, and Tent Caterpillars

Bagworms, Webworms, and Tent Caterpillars

Many caterpillars that feed on trees produce webs, tents or bags, which provide the insects protection from predation and poor weather. This publication will discuss the identification and management of these common pests.
Read more about Bagworms, Webworms, and Tent Caterpillars
Photo of tree with Chlorosis.

Chlorosis of Trees in Central and Western Nebraska

Chlorosis describes any condition in which leaves or needles develop an abnormally light green or yellow color. The most common cause of chlorosis in trees is a deficiency of iron in the tissues. Other causes of chlorosis include over-watering, over-fertilizing, damage to roots, and deficiencies in manganese or other micronutrients.

Read more about Chlorosis of Trees in Central and Western Nebraska
Photo of tree with Clorosis

Chlorosis of Trees in Eastern Nebraska

Chlorosis describes any condition in which leaves or needles develop an abnormally light green or yellow color. The most common cause of chlorosis in trees is a deficiency of iron in the tissues. Other causes of chlorosis include over-watering, over-fertilizing, damage to roots, and deficiencies in manganese or other micronutrients.

Read more about Chlorosis of Trees in Eastern Nebraska
Photo of ash tree in decline.

Decline in Ash Trees: Diseases & Environmental Stresses An Identification Guide

Many diseases and environmental stresses contribute to the decline of ash trees in Nebraska. This publication describes the common characteristics of these problems.
Read more about Decline in Ash Trees: Diseases & Environmental Stresses An Identification Guide
Trees with diplodia blight at their tips.

Diplodia Blight (Tip Blight) of Pines

Diplodia blight is a common disease affecting pines throughout Nebraska. Trees in landscapes, windbreaks, plantations and native pine stands may sustain damage. This brochure discusses Diplodia blight (also known as tip blight or Sphaeropsis blight) and provides suggestions for management and control.

Read more about Diplodia Blight (Tip Blight) of Pines
Photo of a flowering crabapple tree

Diseases of Broadleaf Trees

Broadleaf trees are a critical part of our urban and rural landscapes. If trees are subjected to adverse conditions, an array of issues may arise, including disease. Use this guide to help discover common diseases that affect broadleaf trees in Nebraska. 

Read more about Diseases of Broadleaf Trees
Photo of a ponderosa pine tree branch.

Diseases of Evergreen Trees

Diseases of evergreen trees and shrubs are often fatal if not detected quickly. Use this guide to help spot signs and symptoms of common diseases that affect evergreens in Nebraska. 

Read more about Diseases of Evergreen Trees

Tree planting

Care of Newly Planted Trees

Many recommended practices for newly planted trees have changed in recent years. Here are some tips that will give newly planted trees a better chance to survive and thrive.

Read more about Care of Newly Planted Trees
Picture of a tree planted at the Nebraska capitol building.

How to Plant a Tree

Proper planting is critical to the establishment of healthy, thriving trees. The planting guidelines below have been developed to help new trees get off to a successful start. The recommendations are based on nationally recognized standards as well as experience compiled by the Nebraska Statewide Arboretum and the Nebraska Forest Service. The recommendations assume that an appropriate tree has been selected for the planting site and that the site is suitable for planting.

Read more about How to Plant a Tree
Tree planters standing by a recently planted oak tree.

Replanting After Severe Weather

Tree losses from severe storms can be heavy, and homeowners often lose large trees or trees that have sentimental value. These kinds of trees cannot be replaced. But new properly planted and maintained trees and shrubs add beauty, protection, diversity, and value to almost any property. Trees and shrubs provide these benefits whether they are planted in a park, in front of your house or along a street or highway.

Read more about Replanting After Severe Weather

Top 10 Tree Planting Mistakes

Poor quality trees do not grow to be strong, healthy trees, so successful tree plantings must begin with healthy trees.

Read more about Top 10 Tree Planting Mistakes
Photo demonstrating circling roots caused by a container

Tree Care Basics: Finding the Root of the Problem

Every year, homeowners search nursery catalogs and garden centers for the perfect tree to plant in their yards. They look for a tree that grows fast, isn’t messy, provides abundant shade and is free of insect and disease problems. However once planted, staked, fertilized and nurtured, it struggles and grows very slowly or not at all. This common problem often begins with the roots. There are three main types of damage or injury to root systems that can occur in young trees: root circling caused by a container, root damage, and improper planting techniques.

Read more about Tree Care Basics: Finding the Root of the Problem
Tree plantings in black fabric.

Weed Barrier Fabric

Weed barrier fabric, sometimes referred to as "conservation mulch" or "black plastic", has become a useful tool in establishing conservation tree plantings in Nebraska and across the Great Plains region. The material is a black polypropylene fabric with the appearance of tightly-woven burlap. It is recommended and used most heavily in locations with droughty soils and areas that receive 24 inches of precipitation or less per year. 

Read more about Weed Barrier Fabric

Weed control

Tree plantings in black fabric.

Weed Barrier Fabric

Weed barrier fabric, sometimes referred to as "conservation mulch" or "black plastic", has become a useful tool in establishing conservation tree plantings in Nebraska and across the Great Plains region. The material is a black polypropylene fabric with the appearance of tightly-woven burlap. It is recommended and used most heavily in locations with droughty soils and areas that receive 24 inches of precipitation or less per year. 

Read more about Weed Barrier Fabric

Wildfire

Fireworks exploding in the nighttime sky.

Celebrating Safely: Fireworks 101

Every Independence Day as we celebrate the birth of America, many first responders across the US are on high alert, responding to the careless use of fireworks. We may think of these situations as minor, but even in Nebraska, there are more than 100 reported injuries because of fireworks-related accidents each year. 

Read more about Celebrating Safely: Fireworks 101
Fire encroaches on the city limits of Valentine, Nebraska.

Community Wildfire Protection Plans (CWPP)

A Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP) gathers together your community's resources to enhance wildfire mitigation and preparedness. The written document identifies the steps a community will take to reduce its risk of damage from wildfires. About the photo: Duane Witte shot this photograph in Valentine, NE as the Big Rock Fire crept into the city limits. 

Read more about Community Wildfire Protection Plans (CWPP)

Nebraska Wildfire Control Act

The Wildfire Control Act (WCA) was passed in 2013 in response to massive and highly destructive fires in the state. The WCA has dramatically increased the capacity of the state to reduce risk to life and property while enhancing the management and suppression efforts of wildfires. 

Read more about Nebraska Wildfire Control Act

Nebraska's Single Engine Air Tanker

The Wildfire Control Act of 2013 enabled the establishment of Single Engine Air Tanker (SEAT) bases in Nebraska. SEAT bases are staffed by Nebraska Forest Service during the fire season, primarily working with a SEAT on contract to Nebraska through our partners at the Nebraska Emergency Management Agency.

Read more about Nebraska's Single Engine Air Tanker
A red barn in Nebraska.

Preventing fires on your farm or ranch

Farm and ranch families have always been concerned with fire. America’s rural residents are 1/4 of the nation’s population living on 98 percent of the land, Rural residents must give fire prevention first priority in protecting their homes, families, and businesses from fire. 

Read more about Preventing fires on your farm or ranch

Red Flag Warnings: Critical Fire Weather Conditions

A Red Flag Warning is issued by the National Weather Service (NWS) when weather conditions exist for destructive or rapidly spreading fires. In many cases, fire departments rely on these warnings to make sure firefighters and resources are readily available if a fire were to break out. If you are living in the area where a warning is issued, please use extreme caution or avoid activities that could ignite a wildfire (e.g. discarding cigarettes butts, operating equipment in grassy areas, and open burning of any kind).  

Read more about Red Flag Warnings: Critical Fire Weather Conditions
A screenshot of the new fire reporting system.

Reporting Wildfires

Reporting wildfire activity is an increasingly vital tool that supports many of Nebraska's core volunteer fire department programs, such as the Volunteer Fire Assistance, Federal Excess Personal Property & Firefighter Property, and State Volunteer Fire Assistance programs. This page is meant to serve as a reference guide on how to report wildfires for your department. 

Read more about Reporting Wildfires
A house in the country.

Rural Homes and Wildfire

For many, a rural home has become a dream come true. However, homes are often built for aesthetic values and economic considerations. In many cases, little regard is given to fire protection.

Read more about Rural Homes and Wildfire
Cover of Yellowbook publication

Yellowbook

This publication has been developed by the Wildland Fire Protection Program of the Nebraska Forest Service, as a description of aviation suppression resources available to the rural fire districts and the fire departments in the State of Nebraska for the control and suppression of wildfires. It can be used as a “quick reference” source for those resources available statewide. It is divided into four sections. 

Read more about Yellowbook

Windbreaks

A windbreak helps deter blowing and drifting snow.

How Windbreaks Work

Windbreaks are barriers used to reduce and redirect wind. They usually consist of trees and shrubs, but may also be perennial or annual crops and grasses, fences, or other materials. 

Read more about How Windbreaks Work
Windbreak during winter

Windbreak and Shelterbelt Appraisal

Living windbreaks and shelterbelts are important assets in rural areas of the Great Plains that protect homes, crops and domestic animals from wind throughout the year. They offer a safe haven for wildlife and provide attractive visual barriers. Windbreaks and shelterbelts can have measurable monetary value, and if they are damaged or destroyed, a professional appraisal may be necessary to determine their value.

Read more about Windbreak and Shelterbelt Appraisal
Windbreak near Roca, Nebraska

Windbreak Establishment

A successful windbreak planting depends on proper establishment and care during the first few years after planting. Time spent in site preparation, weed control, and replanting is repaid many times during the life of the windbreak. Take no shortcuts in the planning and establishment of your windbreak. 

Read more about Windbreak Establishment
Photo of windbreak alongside a soybean field

Windbreak Maintenance and Renovation

Windbreaks are integral parts of many Nebraska farming and ranching operations. They protect man, animals, crops and buildings from cold winter winds, hot summer winds, and deep snows. Windbreaks prevent wind erosion and provide wildlife habitat. All windbreaks, even well-designed ones, need regular maintenance. Some windbreaks, especially those that are older or neglected, may need more drastic treatment or renovation.

Read more about Windbreak Maintenance and Renovation
Photo of a pine windbreak, north of Lisco, Nebraska.

Windbreak Management

The windbreaks on your farm are an important part of the agricultural landscape. They provide protection for the farmstead, livestock and crops; provide habitat for wildlife, and contribute to an overall healthy envi­ronment for you and your family. They are living systems with youth, maturity, and old age. Like any other living thing, they need proper care and manage­ment in order to continue to function at their best.

Read more about Windbreak Management
Photo of livestock gathered near a windbreak

Windbreaks for Livestock Operations

Windbreaks play an important role in the protection of livestock, particularly in young animals and in areas with cold northerly winds during the winter and early spring. Properly placed windbreaks can provide benefits to feedlots, livestock pastures, and calving areas. Reducing wind speed in winter lowers animal stress, improves animal health, and increases feeding effi­ciency. Livestock windbreaks provide significant amounts of wildlife habitat, protect the working envi­ronment in and around the livestock area, and screen noise and odors associated with livestock operations.

Read more about Windbreaks for Livestock Operations
Photo of a well-designed farmstead windbreak.

Windbreaks for Rural Living

In many parts of the United States, the constant force of the wind exaggerates daily weather conditions and can make living in these areas seem unbearable. A well-designed windbreak around the home, ranch, or farmstead slows the wind and improves the overall environment. Farm and ranch windbreaks conserve energy, provide snow control, improve working and recreational environments, enhance wildlife populations, provide visual screening and dust control, and increase the production of various wood and food products.

Read more about Windbreaks for Rural Living
Photo of a windbreak during the winter season.

Windbreaks for Snow Management

In areas of high winds and blowing snow, windbreaks can reduce the amount of effort spent on snow man­agement. They can be designed to spread snow across a large area or to confine it to a relatively small storage area.

Read more about Windbreaks for Snow Management

Wood utilization

Portable sawmill processing ash log.

Ash Wood Utilization Options for Homeowners

Emerald ash borer (EAB) poses a serious threat to ash trees in both communities and residential landscapes, killing 80% of ash trees in infested regions within 10 years of its discovery. In communities, standing dead and dying trees will pose a threat to people and property. Unless a homeowner is dedicated to treating their tree long into the future, most ash trees will die and need to be removed.

Read more about Ash Wood Utilization Options for Homeowners

Woody biomass

Pile of wood chips.

Woody Biomass Energy

Heavy dependence on fossil fuels obtained from politically volatile areas, an emerging consensus that carbon emissions must be substantially reduced, and dramatically increasing costs of fuel oil and natural gas are driving the urgent need for alternative energy sources, both in Nebraska and nationally.

Read more about Woody Biomass Energy